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You've likely noticed little "help" buttons at times appearing next to certain input fields, like those featured in the image here: [Source: https://uxplanet.org/streamlining-the-checkout-experience-b4b00840884a ] For the past several posts, we've focused on ways you can provide guidance to users who are inputting data and information on your site,...
In our post on WCAG 3.3.4 Error Prevention (Legal, Financial, Data) , we discussed why it's important to give users a chance to confirm and correct sensitive data or information they may have entered into an online form, specifically relating to financial and legal matters. It's easy for anyone to make mistakes inputting data online, but it's espec...
The last few exciting chapters in our dynamic WCAG adventure have concerned the various guidelines of Principle 3, which stresses the importance of making information and the operation of user interface understandable. Now, we will move onto Principle 4, in which we'll go over how to ensure that the content of your site is robust enough to work rel...
A quick note right off the bat: you probably don't need to worry about this rule unless you're developing or scripting your own user interface components for your site, or you're just very interested in WCAG guidelines. For any user interface component—including links, form elements, and components generated by scripts—it is crucial that the follow...
Let's say for a moment that you are registering for something online, but when you get to the page asking for your personal information, you try to move ahead without entering anything (maybe you're lazy, or perhaps you have a Ron-Swanson-like passion for privacy). Rather than advancing to the next screen, messages in red appear under the fields yo...