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You've likely noticed that when you hover your cursor over buttons and other components online, sometimes a little box appears providing more information about that item. Take, for example, this screenshot taken from a Google Doc: [Source: Google] Or this refresh button [Source: https://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG21/Understanding/content-on-hover-or-focus....
If you've been following the posts in this astonishingly well-written accessibility project of ours, then good news! We are now finished with the first principle of WCAG. We know how excited you must be to explore the bountiful world of swashbuckling adventure that awaits you in WCAG 2, so we'll dive right into it. Whereas Principle 1 of WCAG deals...
Give your readers a way out! Unless you're designing a nefarious maze to trap unsuspecting super-spies on your Island of Doom, you don't want to leave people without a way out. If someone is relying on a keyboard or keyboard emulator navigate your website (as described in WCAG 2.1.1 ), make sure you avoid creating "keyboard traps" It's a Trap! ​ &l...
In our post for WCAG 2.1.1 , we discussed why it's important for your site to be keyboard accessible. In a nutshell, some experiencing visual or physical limitations rely on keyboards and keyboard emulators to navigate the Internet. Wherever possible, your site's functionality should not require users to hold down a key for an extended period of ti...
Character key shortcuts on sites and apps can be an elegant tool that allows many keyboard users to navigate the web quickly and efficiently (if you're curious, here's a demonstration): via GIPHY At the same time, these shortcuts can frustrate and slow down users who rely on speech input programs to operate the web, as well as those who have dexter...
We're finally done talking about keyboards! Hold onto your hats, because we're about to get into WCAG 2.2., which is perhaps even more of an edge-of-your seat thriller than the last few sections. 2.2 stresses the importance of allowing users the time they need to enjoy the content on your site. WCAG 2.2.1: Timing Adjustable - The Basics ​ If some o...
This post is all about distractions. Now, I know what you're thinking. "Distractions? Isn't that what the Internet is for?" That may be true, but nevertheless there may be distracting features on your site that would pose issues for people experiencing visual limitations or attention deficit disorders. With that in mind, we're going to take some ti...
This post deals with the same issue we talked about in WCAG 2.2.1 Time Adjustable . Like we discussed previously, time-dependent content may pose issues for those experiencing certain visual, physical, or cognitive limitations. Whereas WCAG 2.2.1 recommends options that would allow users to control the time limits associated with this content, comp...
Imagine, for a moment, that you're on a beautiful desert island. You're sitting in a beach chair, watching the waves come in, and contemplating WCAG compliance. Just as you're on the brink of a major breakthrough with regard to website accessibility, a roving pack of insurance salesmen start throwing sand at you and telling you that, in all likelih...
As important as data security is, someone experiencing certain physical or cognitive limitations may run into trouble using an authenticated site. If they're on a page with a timed session, they may be automatically logged off for security reasons before they are able to finish what they want to do. For this reason, WCAG 2.2.5 dictates that anyone ...
Let's say for a moment that you're in the market for some quality mustache wax. [Source: https://www.beardbrand.com/collections/mustache-wax/products/spiced-citrus-mustache-wax ] You find the type of wax you want and start to go through the checkout process on the company's website, when suddenly your waxless, wildly unkempt mustache starts to tick...
If you've been following along and you're still with us (hi there!), we're now moving onto Guideline 2.3, which goes over how to avoid designing content that may cause seizures or other physical reactions. In this post, we'll talk about flashes. WCAG 2.3.1 asks that your site not contain any features that flash more than three times per second, as ...
This post, as with our last article on WCAG 2.3.1 , deals with flashing content and the danger it poses to those prone to seizures. Whereas WCAG 2.3.1 describes the Level A standard for flashing content, this rule describes the AAA level. In other words, if you want your site to meet this guideline, it'll be a higher bar to clear. The chance for se...
Look, we all want to trick out our websites with cool effects, but sometimes adding complex visual elements can cause problems for user operability, no matter how dope they may be. In our post on WCAG 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide , we discussed animation that initiates automatically on web pages. Here, we'll talk about animation that a user might trigge...
Recently we've been discussing the various elements of Principle 2, which covers ways you can make your site more easily operable for users experiencing certain visual, cognitive, or physical limitations, as well as those prone to seizures. We are now moving onto the last set of rules in Principle 2, Guideline 2.4, in which we'll go over navigabili...